Seth Ginsberg

Partner

Mr. Ginsberg brings over 25 years of construction management and energy project development experience.  For the past 10 years, Mr. Ginsberg has been focused exclusively on renewable energy projects, including MW-class solar PV, CHP/cogen installations and ground-source geothermal energy systems. Prior to NorthRenew, Mr. Ginsberg was the founder and Managing Partner of Apis Energy Group, an early participant in the advent of Community Shared Solar.  Under his direction, Apis originated installations throughout the United States, delivering both early-stage and turnkey projects to regional and national CSS firms.  Apis continues to provide Owner’s Representation support to private investors, municipalities and higher education institutions seeking to develop PV and other renewable energy and distributed generation projects. Prior to forming Apis Energy Group, Mr. Ginsberg served as the Director of Sustainability for Hobbs, Inc., a third-generation NYC-regional general contracting firm managing over $50m in annual work, where he was responsible for implementing green building strategies into the company’s projects and operations.  Prior to joining Hobbs, Mr. Ginsberg was a construction portfolio analyst for a private equity fund with offices in Stamford, CT, and London, UK where he was responsible for leading due-diligence on property acquisitions and development opportunities.  During the 1990’s Mr. Ginsberg worked for the Turner Corporation where he was responsible for permitting and daily oversight of construction operations for environmentally sensitive projects.  Prior to joining Turner Mr. Ginsberg held various supervisory roles for construction firms throughout the Rocky Mountain region involved in site development and home construction. Mr. Ginsberg studied electrical engineering and economics at the University of Massachusetts and holds a B.A. from Fairfield University.  He received the LEED Accredited Professional certification from the US Green Building Institute in 2007 and was accepted into the American Institute of Building Design in 2002 for his work on low-impact green homes.